Tag Archives: healthy food

Salad Nicoise

12 Jul

*Clears throat*

“Cauliflowers fluffy and cabbages green,

Strawberries sweeter than any I’ve seen,

Beetroot purple and onions white,

All grow steadily day and night!

The apples are ripe and the plums are red,

The broad beans are sleeping in their blankety bed…

(whisper)

The broad beans are sleeping in the blankety bed

Yeah!”

So this is a popular harvest song, but seriously, today was the day I found out that broad beans actually DO sleep in blankety beds!!! It is so beautiful you guys – if you have never podded your own beans and peas, you need to put it on your bucket list. Even if you haven’t grown them yourself – doesn’t matter! I didn’t, but it made me feel so joyful somehow, revealing the perfect little innocent bundles of goodness all tucked up nicely in their natural cushiony houses… *sigh*…

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Moving on then before my insanity becomes a popular topic of conversation.

I know I’ve all but abandoned my poor little bloglet… It’s not that I don’t love it, I do!

Lets just put it down to a confidence thing, okay? As in, *pah, who wants to know that?* or *this is so not Smitten Kitchen* or whatever.

But! This is one mouth-puckeringly intense salad that I would seriously recommend anyone to try!

I’m proud of it, mmkay? That doesn’t happen very often πŸ™‚

Just one note before you read on: the instructions I have given that relate to timing only apply if you want to eat this salad warm. It will be equally delicious cold and far less stressful, as you can cook the different components whenever you’re ready.

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Serves 2.

  • new potatoes (about 12-18 dependent on size and halved if large)
  • 2 large eggs
  • handful of peas and broad beans, fresh and in their pods if possible
  • 1 can of tuna in spring water, drained
  • 2 tomatoes, sliced
  • 5 anchovy fillets in oil, drained and finely chopped
  • handful black olives (about 50g), finely chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, finely chopped
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • handful basil leaves, torn
  1. Start by boiling the potatoes in salted water until tender – about 15-20 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, make the dressing. Simply combine the anchovies, olives, garlic, lemon, olive oil and balsamic vinegar in a small bowl.
  3. About 7 minutes before the potatoes are ready, put the eggs in a pan of boiling water and cook until the potatoes are done. Immediately rinse under cold water to prevent the yolk from going grey, although this shouldn’t be an issue after 7 minutes – you should have delectably oozy, soft-boiled eggs. Mmm… Obviously boil for longer if your heart so desires.
  4. 2 minutes after you’ve put the eggs on, put the beans (freshly podded or no) into boiling water. 1 minute after that, add the peas to the same pan. Again, cook until the potatoes are done, then drain. This is multi-tasking at it’s best πŸ™‚ well… at least I think it is… You want the beans and peas to be tender whilst retaining a bit of bite, so use your common sense here.
  5. Now it is just a matter of assemblage. I layered mine like so: potatoes; tuna; beans and peas; tomatoes; dressing; basil; egg. Whatever floats your boat though – naturally I massacred mine within seconds to make sure there was a coating of that luscious dressing over each and every morsel πŸ™‚

I really hope you enjoy this as much as I did!!!

Oh, oh! And I also served the dressing like this:

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With halloumi, wheat berries, courgette and tomato πŸ™‚ so it’s versatile too! Right on πŸ˜€

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Sesame-Crusted Tofu with Nuoc Cham

18 Jun

Negligence is becoming my middle name.

I am honestly starting to believe that my list of things to do would make anyone stop in their tracks and blink, dazedly. Even the person who is convinced they are the worst procrastinator in the world! I’m worse than that!!! I’m sure if I wrote it all out, it would cover miles of land… I’m picturing one of those enormous scrolls in cartoons that start out looking normal and average-sized, but with a shake of the wrist that unravels the lot… it is clearly formidable to the point of unrealistic goal-setting.

My excuses to avoid getting on with important things recently:

  • My birthday! πŸ˜€

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  • The love’s birthday, and hisΒ mom’s

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  • Dog-sitting

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Me and this bundle of beautiful have totally bonded. I want one of her.

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He, on the other hand, is like a little old man. Adorable though.

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And hilarious.

  • The BBC Good Food Show/Gardener’s World!

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(Haha :D)

  • Symphony Hall

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  • Misc.

Especially the last one. Gosh how that takes up my time!

Included in the ‘misc’ category is Pinterest. Damn you Pinterest I never thought I’d get drawn in! I am weak when it comes to websites laden with beautiful images and ideas… Pinterest is where I found this incredible recipe πŸ™‚

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Which is actually one of those things I would happily have gotten round to earlier, only I couldn’t find black sesame seeds in any of my local shops 😦 and they make the finished dish look so pretty! Don’t you think? Luckily The Good Food Show was just around the corner and of course it didn’t let me down πŸ˜€ Thanks BBC Good Food! (Hire me!) ((Jokes, so not qualified)). You could of course buy some online.

Still, I made it a couple of days ago and I guess it taught me a lesson about striking while the iron is hot when another blogger I follow wrote about the same recipe this morning!!! Now that’s a bit frustrating when I had it all planned.

Oh, what’s that? Your now desperate to follow me on both Tumblr AND Pinterest!? Awesome! Don’t be shy, there’s links to both on the right hand side of my WordPress πŸ˜› just in case you can’t find them I’ve totally helped you out by adding the links above too πŸ˜€

Anyhow, here’s my version:

Serves 2.

  • 1 package of firm tofu
  • 1 egg
  • pinch of salt
  • 3 tbsp breadcrumbs (panko would be best)
  • 2 tbsp white sesame seeds
  • 1 tbsp black sesame seeds
  • oil for frying

For the Nuoc Cham:

  • juice of 1 lime
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 2-3 anchovies, finely chopped
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 fiery chillies (Thai if you can find them), de-seeded (if preferred) and thinly sliced

To Serve:

  • Chopped mixed vegetables (I used spring onions, carrot, sweet red pepper and mushrooms)
  • Noodles or rice
  1. First you need to drain your tofu in whichever way you like to do so. I place mine between 2 chopping boards in the sink and balance something heavy on the top. I would recommend you do this at least an hour before you plan to start cooking.
  2. At least half an hour before planning to eat, make the nuoc cham so the flavours have enough time to become well acquainted. Simply whisk all of the ingredients together and taste. It should be salty (but not too salty), full of interesting flavours, and with subtly ensuing heat from the chillies. The finer you chop the garlic and the chillies, the stronger tasting these aspects of the finished sauce will be.
  3. In a small bowl, beat the egg with 1 tsp water. In a larger bowl, mix the sesame seeds and bread crumbs with the salt.
  4. Slice the (now much firmer) tofu. I like mine to be in chunky cubes – you decide how you like yours and adjust cooking times accordingly. One at a time, dip each piece of tofu into the egg. Scrape off any excess, then roll it around in the bread crumb mixture. Put to one side while you finish the others.
  5. Heat some oil in a large, non-stick frying pan and fry the tofu pieces for about 2 minutes on each side (if following my lead with chunky cubes). Serve with the nuoc cham, veggies and carbs of your choosing πŸ™‚

The nuoc cham is, I think, meant to be used as a dipping sauce, but – tell me if it’s just me – I don’t have the patience for this at dinner time. At dinner time, I’m hungry and I want a bowl full of food. So I used it as a pouring sauce πŸ™‚ make sure you distribute it evenly though if you do it this way, to avoid pungency overload on top and blandness on the bottom.

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Unless there is tofu on the bottom – this stuff is not bland in the slightest! I just mean bland in comparison to the mouth-puckeringness of the sauce πŸ™‚ The tofu is amazingly crisp, then meltingly moreish. It is perfect and I will make it again many, many times.

And I’m just realising that I should have put a disclaimer at the start of this post: Loads of pictures! Looooong post!

Thanks for reading πŸ˜€

Bye!