Chocolate Chestnut Torte

4 Nov

Thank you for voting on my poll! The people’s voice prevails and I made this as a treat for my dad instead of Eve’s pudding (which I still plan to make some time soon!)

I didn’t find this the easiest cake to make, although that might partly be to do with frazzled mindset I was in anyway, and it isn’t the cheapest. I struggled to find chestnut purée but eventually found it in Sainsbury’s, and of course you can buy it online. I suspect it might be easier to find as it gets closer to Christmas, but what do I know 🙂

Due to the mood I was in today, I pledged that if the cake was a disaster, I would stand in for Guy Fawkes and sit on top of my dad’s bonfire to get it going. Thankfully it was delicious. So rich and moist; if you didn’t know what was in it, you probably wouldn’t guess at chestnut purée as it has a very subtle taste, but I savoured the unique mellow sweetness it brought to the table. The effort was worth it! Hurray something went well today 😀

It made me want to experiment more with chestnut purée in recipes where it plays a more obvious part.

This is a BBC Good Food recipe: http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/170604/chocolate-chestnut-torte but it would have helped me more if it was written something like this:

Serves 8

  • 435g tin chestnut puree
  • 142ml pot double cream
  • 50g butter, melted
  • 5 egg whites
  • 125g caster sugar
  • 400g dark chocolate, melted
  • 6 tbsp plain flour
  1. Preheat the oven to 150°c.
  2. In a large bowl, mix the chestnut purée with the melted butter, then add the double cream.
  3. Whisk the egg whites in a clean bowl until fairly stiff, then add the caster sugar in stages until it has all been used. This is a meringue mixture but don’t worry about being able to tip the bowl over your head without the contents getting in your hair.
  4. Add the chocolate and flour to the chestnut mixture, then fold in the meringue mix.
  5. Spoon into a lined 20cm loose-bottomed tin and bake for 55 minutes.
  6. Leave to cool for 5 minutes in the tin, then remove and leave to cool completely on a wire rack.
  7. Serve with cream because do you need a reason? Or ice cream 🙂

Some notes I’d make:

  • I don’t know about you, but I found this oven setting too low. I have kept it the same in my version of the recipe because I know that all ovens are different, but after 55 minutes my cake was still coating the skewer nicely with chocolate when inserted into the middle. I ended up turning the temperature up to around 170°c, and even then it took about 25 minutes extra to cook through. The final insertion of the skewer came out mostly clean, but I believe that, like brownies, you do not want to overcook this cake. You really want squidge, so unfortunately I would recommend checking on your cake fairly regularly towards the end of cooking to ensure that you have the desired results.
  • Due to the meringue mixture (I think), the texture of this cake is a bit different and causes a moderate amount of cracking on the surface and around the edges when cooked, so try to be careful when moving the cake from tin to wire rack and so on. 
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